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Retired Horses: How to Provide the Best Care for Your Elderly Equine


It can be difficult to know when it's time to retire a horse or pony, but it's important to consider the well-being of the animal and ensure they are no longer being asked to do more than they are capable of. Once a horse or pony has retired, it's important to continue providing them with proper care to ensure they are comfortable and healthy in their golden years.


First and foremost, it's important to continue providing your horse or pony with proper nutrition. They may require a different diet than when they were in active work, as they will likely have lower energy requirements. Consult with your veterinarian or a equine nutritionist to determine the best diet for your horse or pony. It's also important to make sure they have access to clean, fresh water at all times.


In addition to proper nutrition, your retired horse or pony will still need regular hoof care and grooming. Regular hoof trims and keeping their coat clean and brushed will help to prevent health issues and keep them looking their best. It's also important to provide regular exercise, even if it's just a leisurely walk around the pasture. This can help to keep them healthy and maintain muscle tone.


When it comes to housing, your retired horse or pony will still need a safe and secure shelter to protect them from the elements. This could be a stable, barn, or a three-sided shelter in the field. It's important to make sure their living space is well-ventilated, clean, and free of drafts.

Should a retired Horse or Pony still be ridden providing it is fit and able?


Whether or not a retired horse should be ridden depends on several factors, including the horse's age and physical condition.


If a retired horse is in good physical condition and has no underlying health issues, gentle riding may be possible. However, it's important to keep in mind that a retired horse may not have the same energy or stamina as they did when they were younger, and it may be necessary to adjust the type and duration of riding accordingly.


Before riding a retired horse, it's important to assess their condition and comfort level. This includes checking their hooves, teeth, and overall body condition, as well as evaluating their movement and behaviour. If a retired horse appears uncomfortable, tense, or resistant to being ridden, it may be best to refrain from riding and consider alternative forms of exercise or activity.


It's also important to consider the type of riding and activity that is appropriate for a retired horse. Gentle activities such as walking, light trotting, or hacking out may be suitable, but more strenuous activities such as jumping or intensive dressage work may not be appropriate.


In conclusion, whether or not a retired horse should be ridden depends on several factors, including their age, physical condition, and previous work history. It's important to consult with a veterinarian and/or a qualified equine professional to determine if a retired horse is fit and able to be ridden, and to assess their condition and comfort level before riding. If a retired horse is in good physical condition and comfortable being ridden, gentle riding may be possible and even to his benefit but it's important to consider the type and duration of riding and to adjust accordingly.


Finding a companion for an old retired horse or pony:



Providing a retired horse or pony with a companion can be a great way to enhance their quality of life and provide them with socialization and mental stimulation. When choosing a companion for your retired horse or pony, it's important to consider their personality, size, and needs.


If your retired horse or pony is still able to go for walks and engage in light exercise, a younger, more energetic companion may be a good fit. However, if your retired horse or pony is older and requires a more sedentary lifestyle, it may be best to choose a companion of a similar age and energy level to avoid and conflicts or injuries.


In addition to finding a companion that is well-suited to your horse or pony's needs, it's important to introduce them slowly and carefully. This can help to prevent any potential conflicts and ensure a smooth transition. You may want to start by introducing your retired horse or pony to their new companion in a neutral space, such as a round pen or large paddock, and gradually increasing the time they spend together as they become more comfortable with one another.


It's also important to continue providing individual care and attention, even if they have a companion. This can help to prevent any feelings of jealousy or neglect and ensure that your retired horse or pony is getting all of the care and attention they need.


Will a Donkey make a good companion?


Donkeys can make good companions for retired horses or ponies, but it's important to consider the individual personalities and needs of both animals. Donkeys are known for their calm and gentle disposition, which can be beneficial for a retired horse or pony who may be more anxious or high-strung.


Donkeys are also intelligent and can be trained to perform various tasks, such as leading a retired horse or pony on a walk or carrying light loads.


However, it's important to remember that donkeys and horses are different species with different social dynamics and behaviours. It's possible that a donkey and a horse may not get along well, especially if they have not been properly introduced. It's also important to consider the size of your retired horse or pony and choose a donkey companion that is similar in size to avoid any potential conflicts or injuries.


In addition to considering the compatibility between a horse or pony and a donkey, it's important to provide both animals with proper care and attention. This includes proper nutrition, regular hoof care and grooming, and a safe and secure living space. By ensuring both animals are well cared for and have a comfortable and enriching environment, you can help to foster a positive and harmonious relationship between them.


With careful planning and consideration, a donkey and a retired horse or pony can form a strong bond and provide each other with companionship and enjoyment in their golden years.


Tough Decisions:


Finally, it's important to monitor your retired horse or pony closely for any changes in behaviour or health. If you notice any concerning changes, be sure to contact your veterinarian for an evaluation. By monitoring their behaviour and health, you can ensure they are not suffering and make any necessary decisions in their best interest.


It is fortunate that with animals, we have the option to release them from suffering, unlike with humans who may be forced to endure suffering until the end of their natural lives.


ABOUT US.


The Confident Rider website was created to help nervous horse riders overcome their anxiety and fear through the use of Self-Hypnosis. See the range HERE


In addition to the Self-Hypnosis audio sessions, we also try to offer advice and resources about all aspects of owning or riding horses and ponies through this Blog. We welcome suggestions for topics that you would like us to cover.


Sharon Shinwell a co-author of the popular book "Ride With Confidence," which was forwarded by Kelly Marks, the well-known Horse Whisperer.



Just click the link HERE to go to the main site.

"This article represents the personal views and opinions of the author and should not be taken as representative of the official policy or position of any organization, professional, expert, or individual."





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