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How to Prepare Your Horse for Spring: A Step-by-Step Guide.


With Spring fast approaching, it's never too early to start planning for your horse's care during the coming months. Even if you are an experienced horse owner, it's always a good idea to review the basics and make sure you have everything you need to keep your horse healthy and happy. This article is intended to provide a general overview of the things you should consider as you prepare for spring, and may be especially useful for first-time horse owners.


Spring is a time of renewal and a great opportunity to get your horse back into shape after the long, cold winter. Here are some tips to help get your horse ready for spring:


Assess your horse's body condition:


After a winter of limited turnout and possibly less-than-ideal nutrition, it's important to assess your horse's body condition. Use the Body Condition Scoring (BCS) system to determine if your horse is underweight, ideal, or overweight. If your horse is underweight, gradually increase their feed and consider adding a weight-gain supplement. If your horse is overweight, consider decreasing their feed and increasing their turnout and exercise.


The Body Condition Scoring (BCS) system is a way to assess the body condition of a horse by looking at their physical appearance and feel. It's important to regularly monitor your horse's BCS to ensure that they are at a healthy weight, as being too thin or too heavy can negatively impact their health and performance.


To use the BCS system, you will need to evaluate your horse's neck, withers, ribcage, loin, and hindquarters. You can do this by visually examining your horse and by running your hands over their body to feel for fat deposits.

The BCS system uses a scale of 1 to 9, with 1 being extremely thin and 9 being extremely obese. A BCS of 5 is considered ideal, with a moderate amount of fat covering the horse's neck, withers, ribcage, and loin.


Here is a breakdown of the BCS scale:


1: Extremely thin, ribcage and spine are visible, no visible fat deposits

2: Thin, ribcage and spine are prominent, no visible fat deposits

3: Thin, ribcage and spine can be felt, minimal fat deposits

4: Moderate, ribcage can be felt, some fat deposits visible

5: Ideal, moderate fat covering neck, withers, ribcage, and loin

6: Ideal to slightly overweight, fat deposits visible on neck, withers, and loin

7: Overweight, fat deposits visible on neck, withers, ribcage, and loin

8: Obese, fat deposits visible on neck, withers, ribcage, loin, and hindquarters

9: Extremely obese, fat deposits visible all over the body, difficulty feeling ribs and spine


It's important to note that the BCS system is subjective and can vary from person to person. It's a good idea to have your veterinarian or a trained professional assess your horse's BCS to ensure that they are at a healthy weight.


Gradually increase exercise:


After a winter of limited exercise, it's important to gradually increase your horse's exercise to prevent injury. Start with short walks or light hacks, and gradually increase the duration and intensity of the rides as your horse becomes more fit.


Here are some specific steps you can take to gradually increase your horse's exercise:

  • Start with short walks or light hacks: After a winter of limited exercise, it's important to start slowly and give your horse's muscles time to warm up and get back into shape. Begin with short walks or light hacks at a leisurely pace, and gradually increase the duration of the rides as your horse becomes more fit.

  • Gradually increase the intensity of the rides: As your horse becomes more fit, you can gradually increase the intensity of the rides by adding in more trotting and cantering. Start with short bursts of trotting and cantering, and gradually increase the duration as your horse becomes more comfortable.

  • Vary your rides: To help prevent boredom and keep your horse engaged, vary the rides by changing the terrain, introducing new obstacles, or adding in some dressage or jumping exercises.

  • Pay attention to your horse's fitness level: As you gradually increase your horse's exercise, pay attention to their fitness level and energy levels. If your horse is struggling to keep up or appears tired, take a break or decrease the intensity of the ride.

By gradually increasing your horse's exercise, you can help prevent injury and ensure that they are physically prepared for the demands of riding.


Cold weather and wet conditions can take a toll on your horse's feet, so it's important to have their feet trimmed and shod as needed. Consider using a hoof moisturizer to help strengthen and protect your horse's feet.


Check your Horse's Feet:



Cold weather and wet conditions can take a toll on your horse's feet, so it's important to have their feet trimmed and shod as needed.

Here are some specific steps you can take to care for your horse's feet during the spring:

  • Have their feet trimmed: Cold weather and wet conditions can cause a horse's hooves to grow excessively, so it's important to have their feet trimmed regularly. A farrier or equine veterinarian can trim your horse's feet to ensure that they are properly balanced and healthy.

  • Shoe your horse if needed: If your horse's hooves are in poor condition or if they will be participating in activities that put a lot of stress on their feet (such as jumping or endurance riding), they may need to be shod by a qualified farrier.

  • Use a hoof moisturizer: Cold, dry weather can cause a horse's hooves to become dry and brittle, which can lead to cracks and other problems. Using a hoof moisturizer can help to strengthen and moisturize your horse's hooves, making them more resilient to the demands of riding.

By taking good care of your horse's feet, you can help to prevent problems and ensure that they are comfortable and healthy.


Consider your horse's healthcare:

Here are some specific steps you can take to ensure that your horse is in good health:

  • Schedule a check-up with your veterinarian: Spring is a good time to schedule a check-up with your veterinarian to assess your horse's overall health. Your veterinarian can check your horse's teeth, eyes, hooves, and overall body condition, and make recommendations for any necessary treatment or care.

  • Deworm your horse: Springtime can bring an increase in parasites, so it's a good idea to deworm your horse to help prevent infestations. Your veterinarian can recommend the appropriate deworming schedule and products for your horse.

  • Check your horse's vaccination status: Make sure that your horse is up-to-date on their vaccinations to help protect them from preventable diseases. Your veterinarian can recommend the appropriate vaccination schedule for your horse.

  • Pay attention to your horse's behaviour and appetite, as these can be indicators of their overall health. If you notice any changes or abnormalities, be sure to consult with your veterinarian.


By taking good care of your horse's healthcare needs, you can help to prevent problems and ensure that they are healthy and happy.


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In addition to the Self-Hypnosis audio sessions, we also try to offer advice and resources about all aspects of owning or riding horses and ponies through this Blog. We welcome suggestions for topics that you would like us to cover.


Sharon Shinwell a co-author of the popular book "Ride With Confidence," which was forwarded by Kelly Marks, the well-known Horse Whisperer.



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"This article represents the personal views and opinions of the author and should not be taken as representative of the official policy or position of any organization, professional, expert, or individual."


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